Fiendishly good works

Now that I have your attention: The Ministry of Stories is a British organization “dedicated to the creation of stories by a new storytelling generation.”  From the “We made this” blog, ” The Ministry [is] a writing centre where kids aged 8-18 can get one-to-one tuition with professional writers and other volunteers; with the centres being housed behind fantastical shop fronts designed to fire the kids’ imaginations (and generate income for the writing centres).

In our case, the shop is Hoxton Street Monster Supplies – Purveyor of Quality Goods for Monsters of Every Kind.”

The snot (lemon curd?) is just one of the East London store’s monstrously clever offerings.

(Lots more pictures at the We Made This site.)

The organization, inspired by 826 Valencia, was founded by Nick Hornby and co-directors Lucy Macnab and Ben Payne. From the Ministry of Stories site: “Hidden away at the back of The Monster Shop (where else would you expect it?), the Ministry of Stories provides a free space for fresh writing by young people. Here in Hoxton we provide workshops and one-to-one mentoring. The services are provided by volunteers: local writers, artists and teachers, all giving their time and talent for free.

The MoS is inspired by young people, and aims to inspire them to transform their lives through writing. We work closely with schools, supporting the work of teachers, but our great benefit is that we provide one-to-one mentoring for young people to enjoy imaginative stories, improve language skills, increase abilities in communication, add to social and educational confidence.”

See, proof that there’s still hope for humankind.

This link came via Professor Batty’s delightfully electic blog, Flippism is the Key.

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8 responses to “Fiendishly good works

  1. That’s pretty awesome stuff!

  2. Okay, you have my undivided attention. but, ewwww? I’ll never be able to look at lemon curd again.
    :)

  3. @ Amy: yes, both the goodies and the idea!

    @ GB: all in a good cause :)

  4. I remember being stifled as a teen, any writing I did was encouraged (although I will admit it was fairly crude and sexually suggestive at times) I would have loved to have a chance to work with a real writer…

  5. Let me try this again:

    I remember being stifled as a teen, any writing I did was DISCOURAGED (although I will admit it was fairly crude and sexually suggestive at times.) I would have loved to have a chance to work with a real writer…

  6. @ Batty: Me too! The yardstick for writing quality in my time was vocabulary rather than originality or style, and I wrote pompous crap. I had to unlearn a lot about writing before I began to get published.

  7. Wow, this sounds great – wish I had had exposure to something like that as a child when I was an aspiring writer!